Ice crack recordings 2010.

It was time for me to go back to France for Christmas, eat some snails, frog legs, a boat load of strong liquors and I was ready to go in the field recording ice cracks in the small mountains of Les Vosges accompanied of my father and my brother.

Here is a short edit of our best performances. I just used Comp and EQ to bump up the low levels.

We got up early and drove by some small frozen puddles, some medium size ponds and finally a small lake. I thought it would be good to try different thicknesses of ice sheets so I knew we should be prepared for the cold and the possibility of falling in the water..

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Even with a -18°C peak in the morning, my brother undressed when he heard his snow pants (that’s when the strong liquors come very handy) and then he got to work.

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.Natural ice is definitely a fantastic inexpensive material that you can throw, scrub, break, scatter and lick (huh!). It can sometimes sound like breaking glass, falling rock or wood creaking!

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.During winter, most forests are very silent because of the surrounding snow that work as a natural insulation, so if you find a spot with no wind, planes or birds, you can get some very detailed textures from different perspectives that will help you later on. Check out the great work of Frank Bry and Richard Devine for more info.

Thanks to Richard and Alain.

  1. I’m making a water-inspired dance tune…any way I could get a WAV of these great sounds to incorporate??

  1. August 2nd, 2011