Happy accident 1 – Disneyland shot glass

I recently drank some Double Espresso Flavored Vodka out of an old Disneyland shot glass that I received as a gift a year ago. As I’m washing my dishes in the sink, I noticed some sugar stuck at the tight bottom of the glass, so I tried to remove it by rubbing my wet index finger and it just made this crazy sound! First, I thought it was a frog (after all, I’m French) and by opening and closing my left hand on top of the glass, I could basically make it speak like you do with your mouth. It was like controlling the sound of somebody scratching his own throat with a fork :-).

Here’s an edit of my best takes:

Abstract experiments 2 – TwistedTools’ Scapes

“I believe the future is only the past again, entered through another gate” ~ A. Wing Pinero, The Second Mrs. Tanqueray, 1893.

The settings for science fiction are often contrary to known reality, but the majority of science fiction relies on a considerable degree of suspension of disbelief, which is facilitated in the audience’s mind by potential scientific explanations or solutions to various fictional elements.

This sci-fi demo was made from a package of sounds that I recorded and mangled in Reaktor with Scapes (Twisted Tools) that is available here FOR FREE!

Ice crack recordings 2010.

It was time for me to go back to France for Christmas, eat some snails, frog legs, a boat load of strong liquors and I was ready to go in the field recording ice cracks in the small mountains of Les Vosges accompanied of my father and my brother.

Here is a short edit of our best performances. I just used Comp and EQ to bump up the low levels.

We got up early and drove by some small frozen puddles, some medium size ponds and finally a small lake. I thought it would be good to try different thicknesses of ice sheets so I knew we should be prepared for the cold and the possibility of falling in the water..

.

.

.

.

.

.

...

Even with a -18°C peak in the morning, my brother undressed when he heard his snow pants (that’s when the strong liquors come very handy) and then he got to work.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.Natural ice is definitely a fantastic inexpensive material that you can throw, scrub, break, scatter and lick (huh!). It can sometimes sound like breaking glass, falling rock or wood creaking!

.

.

.

.

.

.

.During winter, most forests are very silent because of the surrounding snow that work as a natural insulation, so if you find a spot with no wind, planes or birds, you can get some very detailed textures from different perspectives that will help you later on. Check out the great work of Frank Bry and Richard Devine for more info.

Thanks to Richard and Alain.

Field and Toys 2010.

Abstract experiments 1 – Small creatures.

Don’t you subconsciously picture something in your mind when you hear sounds in the dark? Don’t you think of a sound when you look at a picture in a silent room?

“We begin to hear before we are born, four and a half months after conception. From then on, we develop in a continuous and luxurious bath of sounds: the song of our mother’s voice, the swash of her breathing, the trumpeting of her intestines, the timpani of her heart”. (Michel Chion, Audio-Vision)

  • I’ve recently experimented designing creature vocalizations with no visual material. And as you can imagine, it was pretty hard to keep a single direction! But it gave me total freedom, trying things randomly and reacting with sounds like performers do. I’m still working on defining the limits though ;-)


.“Experiment as early and as often and as inexpensively as possible. Make lots of mistakes when mistakes are cheap”. Randy Thom